Showing posts with label jase harper. Show all posts
Showing posts with label jase harper. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

2014 Sticky Zine Fair

Blurry out-of-focus poorly lit photos of some comic people at the 2014 Sticky Zine Fair.

 David Blumenstein and Anthony Woodward


More People

 Andrew Fulton

 Ive Sorocuk and Alex E Clark

 Jase Harper

 David Blumenstein

 Myles Loughran

 Frank Candiloro

 Phil Bentley

 Marc Pearson

 Michael Fikaris

 Simon Hanselmann

 Michael Hawkins

 Grant Gronewald

 Chris O'Brien and Joanna Anderson

Sam Wallman

David C Mahler

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Places To Put Your Money

Chromacon, the upcoming New Zealand Illustration and Comic Art Festival are five days out from the end of their crowdfunding campaign on Pledgeme. As of this writing they are about $200 short of their target.

Ben Hutchings is primarily known as a musician but he does have a sideline making comics. Ben's publisher Milk Shadow Books have a Hutchings sale on at the MSB store.

A fine cover by Hutchings' band Tootleg Boy of Limahl's sublime classic The Never Ending Story. One time I listened to this for two hours straight and came out a better man for it.

Ive Sorocuk's latest mini comic Everybody Comics Face is available to order online.

Bathwater Books have two recent comics by Scarlette Baccini.

The Silent Army Online Store offer comics by a fine selection of cartoons including Tim Danko, David C. Mahler, Jase Harper, Simon Hanselmann, M P Fikaris and more.

Sunday, April 7, 2013

Paper Trail

Jerome Bihan on tumblr, A Strict Diet of Self.

Zen Pencils in Hindi.

David Blumenstein Flickr set for Camp Chugnut 2013.

Not comics: The Listener records remembrances of recently passed New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere.

Bookmarks catch up: Margaret Irvine writes about Eric Heath.


Becky Dreistadt & Frank Gibson guest on Panel Borders.

Jase Harper blogs the creation of his graphic novel at Awk-ward.

Wellington art gallery and zine/comic stockists Matchbox Studios.

 Nat Karmichael writes about Jackie Ryan's Burger Force.

 Ness interviews Bruce Mutard.

Callout for papers related to Australasian humour for the 20th Australasian Humour Studies Network Colloquium on 14,15 February 2014 at the National Library in Wellington. Ian Grant, Chair of the New Zealand Cartoon Archive at the National Libary, will give a keynote presentation on the history of New Zealand cartooning.

Details here.

Limited copies of Simon Hanselmann's St Owl's Bay broadsheet (with special deleted scene!) are now available from the Silent Army online store.

Lauren Davis destroys Dylan Horrocks website, writing about Sam Zabel and the Magic Pen.

Talking about New Zealand comics Panel discussion with  Dylan Horrocks, Sam Orchard, Adrian Kinnaird and Sarah Laing at ST PAUL St Gallery in Auckland.

2013 Zine and Indy Comic Symposium in Brisbane.

Facebook gallery of launch party for the collected book of Matthew Hoddy and Caitlin Major's webcomic Space Pyrates.

Cory Doctorow reviews Tim Molloy's Mr Unpronounceable Adventures, available now from Milk Shadow Books.

Bookmarks catch up: New Zealand Political Cartoon Annual 2012.

Bobby N photo blogs the April Melbourne comics meet up.

Alan Rose Cartoons and Caricatures.

Regular Show cover by Rebecca Clements.

Matt Huynh talks coffee.

Read three Matt Huynh comics debuting at this years Mocca Arts Festival.

   Paper Trail masthead courtesy of Toby Morris.

Thursday, December 13, 2012

2012 in Review: Jase Harper

Jase Harper

What have been your personal cartooning/comics highlights of 2012?

I’d have to say collecting and printing my comic strips at this year’s Sticky zine fair, was a lot of fun and I got lots of positive feedback which is always nice. Another highlight was visiting the Small press Expo in the states and getting to see comic Gods, Ware, Burns and Clowes all in the same room.

Who are some of the comics creators that you've discovered and enjoyed for the first time in 2012?

Joseph Lambert. I picked up his book ‘I will bite you!’ at SPX this year. His stories are playful, beautiful and surreal. ‘Turtle keep it steady’ from that book is probably my fave thing this year.

What is something non-comics that you have enjoyed in 2012?

I saw a retrospective of the Quay brothers at Moma that was amazing.  After pouring over their animations at art college it was mind blowing to see their stop motion sets first hand, So beautiful and creepy.

Have you implemented any significant changes to your working methods this year?

I came to a realisation that doing super clean artwork is painful and I just don’t enjoy it anymore, for my personal work at least. Swapping to brush pens was a big step, It gave my line work a bit more of a lively feel, plus I’m able to produce a page much quicker now.

What are you looking forward to in 2013?

For those who are members of the Mini Comic of the Month club I’ll be releasing my 16 pg mini in January. I'm a few pages in and really enjoying it. I also have a chapter in Jason Franks next Sixsmiths book, which I’m pretty chuffed about. I’m also looking forward to finishing my long form comic sometime next year as well, it’s well overdue. As for other people’s work. I’m super keen to see Tim Molloy’s next book as well as more of J Stew’s Giants.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

Minicomics of the Month - Andrew Fulton Interview

Melbourne cartoonist and Smaller Comics Capo Andrew Fulton has launched Minicomic of the Month an initiative to get Australian comics into the hands of readers that might not otherwise be able to find them.

I asked Andrew a few questions about Minicomic of the Month and the folk involved.

If I recall rightly this is the second year of Minicomic of the Month (MOTM)? What was the initial response like? What has it been like this time?

Yeah this is the second time we are doing this - the first one Pat Grant kicked off in 2009. You can still see his original pitch here: I got an email one day asking if I wanted to be in it. At that point I had been doing the webcomic for a while but really hadn't done much physical printing of stuff. I think I might have been in a Tango? It ended up being the first proper mini I actually made and stapled for real.

What inspired the use of a subscription format for getting your comics to prospective readers?

The first time sold out pretty much overnight, so the response was great. I think this time it has been a little slower, but still a great response, and spread a bit wider too - we have a larger percentage of international subscribers this time around, which is great.

Not sure that I can answer directly to 'inspiration' as I have just stolen Pat's idea, but I think the subscription is a great way to spread work around. It's a pretty cheap up front cost from people, there's a sort of energy and excitement that's different from buying something in a store. And people probably get a mix of things from people whose work they know, and some they are less familiar with. And just on a practical level it helps keeps costs down - you know exactly how many you need to print, you don't end up with the World's Saddest Cupboard, Overflowing With Unsold Books.


Are the mini-comics in a uniform format? Are the physical comics produced by each individual creator?

Initially I had thought to do a uniform format, and kind of centralise the production and logistics of things to make it a bit easier. But in the early stages of discussion we decided that that took a little bit of the magic out of it. Part of the fun is that someone is making this little minicomic with mostly their bare hands, stapling it up and licking the stamps. There's a personal connection there.

Is the subscription model for MOTM set at a limited run? Will each installment of Minicomic of the month be mailed from the individual creators?

Yeah, we are planning to limit the subscriptions. We kind of agreed on 100 being the most we wanted to have to physically put together and mail. I don't really want it to become a burden, but also I also know it sold out super quick the first time around and a lot of people missed out.

And yeah, each month the individual is responsible for getting it together and mailing it out - although a large chunk of us are in Melbourne so we could get together for a stapling party or two.

 Australian Cartoonists in America: Caravan of Comics

Did you take anything from your experiences on the Caravan of Comics from the American indy/alt/minicomic scene that could be applied to Australia?

The Caravan was probably the biggest inspiration for getting this thing rolling again, and kind of sustain that momentum of getting Australian Comics out into the world. It's kind of a downer but one of the big things I "took" from the Caravan was a reminder of how far away we are from everything. There's a much larger audience for our work that it's not all that easy to connect with from here, Facebook and Twitter and all that aside - $5 shipping on a $3 or whatever is kind of a hard sell. And I guess even worse if someone wants one of my books and one of yours, that's even worse maths. I think I may have lost my point in here. I guess it's maybe that giving people a single point Get a bunch of things from different people at once is a way to combat that? But then, in some ways the answer to that is digital distribution- sensibly we should be doing something like this as ebooks or whatever? Forget about distance. But that comes back to what I was saying about magic. It's the personal touch or whatever that makes a project like this work.

Some of the creators involved in MOTM have books published through large above ground publishers, What do you think is the appeal in producing comics at a minicomic scale?

You'd probably have to ask someone like Pat or Mandy, but again I think it is about the personal touch, about being able to do something quickly and send it out directly to your audience. It's not something you have to spend years toiling over, it's quick, dirty and fun.

Images © 2012 respective artists.